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New York Immigration Achievement Awards


Immigrant advocates: ‘Attrition through enforcement’ immigration policy already a reality

Published on Tue, Feb 07, 2012


Immigration advocates said Monday that an “attrition through enforcement” immigration strategy is nothing new, and already interferes with the daily lives of undocumented and their families, including U.S.-born children.

The term “attrition through enforcement” was first used by immigration restrictionists in 2003 and implemented in 2005, Michelle Waslin of the Immigration Policy Center said on a conference call Monday. Waslin added that immigration restrictionist organizations like the Federation for American Immigration Reform, the Center for Immigration Studies and Numbers USA have sought to market the strategy by arguing it would prove less expensive and more reasonable than mass deportation.

Waslin said the strategy would force undocumented immigrants to leave, regardless of how long they have been in the U.S. and how this impacts U.S.-born children. She added that citizens will pay more in taxes to implement the strategy, which also impacts businesses.

Jonathan Blazer of the American Civil Liberties Union said during the call that “states have served as major laboratories of experimentation for [immigration] restrictionists who seek to push the bills farther and farther.”

He added that because language in state bills is copied word for word and introduced simultaneously, the movement is “a nationally coordinated effort through” groups like the Federation for American Immigration Reform, known as FAIR, the Immigration Reform Law Institute, State Legislators for Legal Immigration and the American Legislative Exchange Council.

Three Florida state representatives are current members of State Legislators for Legal Immigration, including Rep. Gayle Harrell, R-Port St. Lucie, who filed a bill in the current legislative session that would mandate the use of an employment authorization program known as E-Verify.Read more...

Published in the The Florida Independent

The LAC Docket

The LAC Docket is the newsletter of the American Immigration Council's Legal Action Center. To view individual editions of the newsletter, please click the links below. Archives of our former newsletter -- the Litigation Clearinghouse Newsletter -- can be found here.

The LAC Docket | Vol. V, Issue 3 (June 17, 2015)

This issue of the Docket highlights our class action lawsuit challenging unconstitutional conditions in CBP detention facilities; our national class action lawsuit challenging USCIS delays in EAD adjudication; the Supreme Court decision in Mata v. Lynch; our ongoing work in a recently filed class action against CBP over its failure to timely respond to FOIA requests; continued efforts to ensure legal representation for children in removal proceedings; and our collaborative efforts to end family detention and provide legal services to women detained in Karnes City and Dilley, Texas.

The LAC Docket l Volume V, Issue 2 (April 15, 2015)

This issue of the Docket highlights a Seattle District Court decision refusing to dismiss J.E.F.M. v. Holder, which challenges the government’s failure to provide legal representation to thousands of unrepresented children in removal proceedings; our recently filed class action against CBP over its failure to timely respond to FOIA requests; ongoing work to defend against legal challenges to Executive Action; and our collaborative efforts to end family detention and provide legal services to women detained in Karnes City and Dilley, Texas. This issue also lists several new and updated Practice Advisories.Read more...

Rounding up reactions to the Supreme Court hearing on Arizona immigration crackdown

Published on Thu, Apr 26, 2012

The Supreme Court of the United States, which heard arguments in the lawsuit against Arizona’s immigration enforcement law Wednesday, will not issue its decision until June, but opponents and supporters continue to argue the merits of the state’s crackdown.

The court heard arguments on the legality of only four provisions contained in the Arizona law, known as S.B. 1070. Analysts on both side of this issue say the court’s eventual decision will affect the future of immigration laws across the U.S. Read more...

Published in the The Florida Independent

Fundamental Principles of J Sponsorship


We are frequently asked by interested members of the immigration law community what are the basic principles which we use for strategic planning in the development of the International Exchange Center.

Here are the ten principles that guide our planning and decision making: Read more...

65,000 Bay Area immigrants could benefit from deportation policy, study states

Published on Sun, Aug 05, 2012

IPC's own Wendy Sefsaf was quoted in a Mercury News article about DREAMers living in the Bay Area.  In that area alone, there are about 65,000 immigrants who could benefit from Obama's new deportation policy coming into effect August 15, 2012.  But the Bay Area isn't the only region of the country with hopeful DREAMers:  Read more...

Published in the Mercury News

Ali B. Cambel

Ali B. Cambel was born in Merano, Italy, in 1923 of Turkish parents who were in the diplomatic corps. He is a naturalized U.S. citizen, a member of the Religious Society of Friends, and is a widower.

Mr. Cambel received his early education through home tutoring. He gained admission to Robert Academy, an American prep school and then to Robert College in Istanbul, Turkey where he received his first degree with honors in the humanities and sciences at age nineteen. He pursued graduate work in chemical engineering at the University of Istanbul, naval architecture at M.I.T., and mechanical engineering at CalTech. He holds an M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering and mathematics from the University of Iowa. He is also a licensed professional engineer.Read more...

AIC Executive Director Ben Johnson in the New York Times

Published on Thu, Apr 04, 2013

The AIC's Executive Director, Ben Johnson, was quoted in the New York Times on Thursday.  The article, focusing on the pathway to citizenship expected to be included in the upcoming immigration bill, called on Johnson's expertise on how the process is expected to work:

“There is broad recognition that these folks will have to go through a process of atonement,” said Benjamin E. Johnson, executive director of the American Immigration Council, a group in Washington that works to build support for immigration. “But ultimately at the end of the process they would become full-fledged members of our society through American citizenship.”

Published in the New York Times

Josiah McC. Heyman, Ph.D

Josiah McC. Heyman, Ph.D is Professor of Anthropology and Chair of the Department of Anthropology and Sociology at University of Texas El Paso. His current work addresses border security, including a comprehensive review of U.S. border policies since 9/11. He is also doing research on access and barriers to health care for immigrants, and Latinas/os more generally, in El Paso. Previous work has examined U.S. border enforcement, U.S. border officers, and border communities and cultures. 

IPC Report Featured in VOXXI

Published on Wed, Sep 04, 2013

A recent article on VOXXI featured a recent Special Report created by IPC Fellow Rob Paral, entitled, "Stepping Up:  The Impact of the Newest Immigrant, Latino, and Asian Voters."

The report, which details the future changes the U.S. Congress can expect in terms of voter demographics, was the central focus of the article: 

"The newly released study shows that the electoral composition in congressional districts is on track to change as more naturalized U.S. citizens and young Latinos and Asians — many of whom support immigration reform — become eligible to vote in the next few years.

“Representatives contemplating their eventual vote on immigration reform need to weigh the numerous policy arguments in favor of reform and make an informed decision, but they must also understand the shifting demographic dimensions of their districts,” stated Rob Paral, the author of the study."

Published in the VOXXI