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Integration and Citizenship

Earned Legalization: Repairing our Broken Immigration System

We can expect every major piece of comprehensive reform legislation to tackle the issue of creating a legal status for the 11- 12 million undocumented immigrants residing in the United States.  Ultimately, most politicians and policy makers agree that practically, the U.S. cannot deport this population, and some kind of process for legalizing status is necessary.  However, there remains a temptation to create high penalties in exchange for a green card because many politicians want to ensure that people have paid the price for coming to the country illegally.  An overly punitive process, however, ultimately defeats the purpose of a legalization program because it will deter people from participating and potentially drive people further underground.  A successful legalization program combines measured penalties with clear and achievable goals that will get the maximum number of people into the system, identify the relatively few who do not belong here based on criminal activity,  and integrate those who can contribute their talents as quickly as possible. 

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Published On: Thu, Nov 05, 2009 | Download File

American Roots in the Immigrant Experience

The U.S. Census Bureau recently released data on the Latino population of the United States that underscores the extent to which the immigrant experience is embedded in the social (and political) fabric of the United States. The political significance of these statistics is apparent in the most recent IPC Fact Check. Latinos comprise the fastest-growing group of voters in the United States. The number of naturalized U.S. citizens is increasing rapidly and the electoral clout of New American voters who share a direct, personal connection to the immigrant experience—that is, naturalized citizens and the U.S.-born children of immigrants—is on the rise.

Published On: Mon, Oct 19, 2009 | Download File

Record-Breaking Number of Immigrants Seek Integration, U.S. Citizenship

September 17th is Citizenship Day—a day to recognize and celebrate all of the immigrants who have chosen to integrate fully and become U.S. citizens.  While some fear that demographic shifts threaten American identity, research and experience have shown that today’s immigrants integrate into American society just like generations of immigrants before them.  Citizenship Day is a time to celebrate the many immigrants who have taken a step toward full integration and participation in U.S. civic life. 

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Published On: Tue, Sep 16, 2008 | Download File

Separating Fact from Fiction: Refugees, Immigrants and Public Benefits

Anti-immigrant activists like to stir up anger by distorting the facts with dishonest claims.

Published On: Mon, Sep 08, 2008 | Download File

Balancing Federal, State, and Local Priorities in Police-Immigrant Relations

Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, changes in federal, state, and local law-enforcement priorities and practices have had a profound impact on America’s Muslims, Arabs, and South Asians.  Some of these policy shifts applied exclusively or primarily to those communities, such as the federal “special registration” program, selective enforcement of immigration laws based on national origin or religion, and expanded federal counter-terrorism efforts that targeted these communities.  At the same time, a wide range of ethnic groups have been affected by the use of state and local police agencies to enforce federal immigration law, and the aggressive use of detention and deportation authority for even minor infractions and technicalities.

Across the United States, police departments and Muslim, Arab, and South Asian communities have responded with varied approaches to the new post-September 11 reality.  In some cities, serious tensions between law-enforcement agencies and immigrant communities have arisen.  Other cities have taken steps to alleviate these tensions and promote dialogue and cooperation with immigrant communities.  This report evaluates the challenges and successes of recent trust-building efforts between immigrant communities and local police departments, and the responses of each to new and proposed policies that threaten those efforts.  Using the experiences of Muslim, Arab, and South Asian communities, the report offers insights that apply to much broader populations.  It draws attention to best practices and policy solutions such as the creation of more effective channels for public dialogue and communication, public education campaigns, officer training and recruiting programs, and forms of cooperation between police and community organizations.

Published On: Tue, Jun 24, 2008 | Download File

How Errors in Basic Pilot/E-Verify Databases Impact: U.S. Citizens and Lawfully Present Immigrants

Highlights the impact of a mandatory electronic employment verification system on U.S. citizens.

Published On: Tue, Apr 01, 2008 | Download File

Why Don't They Come Legally

Answers the question, "why don't undocumented immigrants simply come legally?" and provides basic information on how the U.S. legal immigration system works.

Published On: Thu, Feb 28, 2008 | Download File

Immigration: Long Term Trends and America's Future Arrival Rates, Integration Patterns, and Impact on an Aging Society

Immigration has begun to level off and immigrants are climbing the socio-economic ladder and becoming increasingly important to the U.S. economy as workers, taxpayers, and homebuyers supporting the aging Baby Boom generation.

Published On: Tue, Feb 26, 2008 | Download File

Questions and Answers about Driver's Licenses Now That Final REAL ID Regulations Have Been Issued

This fact sheet's questions and answers take an in-depth look at the provisions of the final REAL ID Act regulations that particularly affect immigrants.

Published On: Fri, Feb 01, 2008 | Download File

Thinking Ahead About Our Immigrant Future: New Trends and Mutual Benefits in Our Aging Society

By Dowell Myers, Ph.D.

There are two stories now being told about immigration and the future of America. Each has some basis in fact, although one is based on newer trends and is more optimistic than the other. These stories differ in their answers to three crucial questions: whether immigration to the United States is accelerating out of control or is slowing; how much immigrants are assimilating into American society and progressing economically over time; and how important immigrants are to the U.S. economy. The pessimistic story—in which immigration is portrayed as increasing dramatically and producing a growing population of unassimilated foreigners—draws upon older evidence. But more recent data and analysis suggest a far more positive vision of our immigrant future. Immigration has not only begun to level off, but immigrants are climbing the socio-economic ladder, and will become increasingly important to the U.S. economy as workers, taxpayers, and homebuyers supporting the aging Baby Boom generation. Read more...

Published On: Tue, Jan 01, 2008 | Download File